TypeFocus Careers
Home Questions Contactus      
 
  Is your career on target?
 
 

Questions? - Ethics

    < back to main

These 16 principles are adapted from the Association of Psychological Type's statement of ethics. Their website address is: http://www.aptcentral.org/aptethic.htm

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16

1. Provide face to face interpretations and time in workshops to answer individual questions.
Individuals should be comfortable with what they discover about themselves. We encourage facilitators to set aside time at the beginning of any workshop to provide individual feedback and answer questions. In the supplementary lesson plans and exercises, facilitators are fully supported in this regard - even if the person is only doing it for themselves! There are over 70 help files that teach users about theory and application. Most questions are answered as participants work through the program.
Back to top

2. Be sure to present the type preferences and types as describing probable patterns of behavior rather than fixed "trait like" behaviors.
The complexity of human behavior is beyond any one model or theory. People have the ultimate ability to choose what they want to do. We reinforce this throughout the program.
Back to top

3. Be sure to remind the individual receiving type feedback that he or she is the expert - only the individual can verify which type fits best.
This point empowers the individual and flows from #2. The program offers the user a choice after presenting their online scored results. The user can accept or reject their "indicated" type. The very fact that this facet into our program illustrates the commitment we have around individual empowerment. Right at the start of the program, the user has this point demonstrated to them by this feature of TypeFocusTM.
Back to top

4. Present type as a working "hypothesis" allowing for deeper and richer exploration of self and others.
Again, the user is encouraged throughout the program to recognize that they are learning something valuable about themselves, but they should also keep an open mind about what it all means to them.
Back to top

5. Explain that type is not "pigeon-holing" because individual types are complex, dynamic and capable of unique patterns of behavior and development.
This is a direct quote from our facilitator's manual:
"Before they go, there is one point to emphasize: No one wants to be pigeon-holed by any system and some might object to being "labeled" as one personality type versus another. This is a common and valid objection and needs to be addressed with gentleness and thoroughness. Mention to the class that some might be concerned about this and you will address it in the next class but for now, draw on the analogy of handedness: Knowing whether you are right or left-handed doesn't limit you because you can still use both hands. Knowing which personality type you are doesn't limit you because you can use either preference. However, the knowledge frees you to make better choices."
Back to top

6. When using career-related data such as type tables, stress in a variety of ways that type theory has no implications for competence, capability or performance in a chosen career path but is excellent for examining career interest tendencies and choices.
TypeFocusTM certainly makes this point as illustrated by #4.
Back to top

7. When sharing type data be sure to distinguish between research and anecdotal evidence.
TypeFocusTM uses anecdotal stories that are clearly anecdotal to illustrate concepts. However, we often do refer to research and we distinguish between the two.
Back to top

8. Be sure to provide materials for further study.
The heart of our program is a set of holistic, personalized reports that can and should be developed over time. Anyone using our program has the luxury of TIME, so one can develop an expertise as one goes along. As well, we provide a large number of outside links to excellent Internet sources for type knowledge.
Back to top

9. Emphasize and illustrate the dangers of over simplifying or misusing type theory.
We emphasize through examples and direct encouragement that users should see type theory as a way of understanding themselves and building on that understanding. We actively discourage any simplistic approaches such as, "If I'm an Introvert, I probably wouldn't make a good group leader."
Back to top

10. Participation is voluntary.
Voluntary participation is emphasized in our facilitator notes. In one of our exercises, we state: "If any client does not want to let their type be known, it becomes a teachable moment between you and them in private. Ethically, clients should not have to reveal this bit of information about themselves. However, since many classroom exercises involve breaking clients into type-alike groups and freely discussing their type, the client will be removing themselves from these activities and it can be awkward for them. However, if that is their choice, you should support it. On the other hand, they may not understand something about type (e.g., they think an introvert is shy) or they are unlike a friend and think they'll be rejected. Often, once you've explained everything and offered to work with them in their journey of discovery, they will feel much better and willingly share their type."
Back to top

11. Guarantee confidentiality of type results.
TypeFocusTM offers a unique opportunity for everyone to participate in a totally confidential way because it is offered online with individuals setting their own passwords.
Back to top

12. Describe preferences and present type descriptions prior to sharing results and verifying type to allow for individual self-assessment.
InTypeFocusTM type is assessed, then confirmed. However, the confirmation takes place, and the user is empowered to make the choice. In fact, the program allows users to re-visit their type and change different type factors to see what effect this will have on their reports.
Back to top

13. Use language which says "Your preferences..." rather than "You are..."
This has been followed.
Back to top

14. Inform the audience that the preference scores do not imply excellence, competence, or ability but are an indication of consistency in "voting" for the preferences.
We use the analogy of handedness. The fact that you are 100% sure that you are right handed does not indicate your skill level in using your hand. Likewise, a surgeon might be right handed but extremely skilled in tying knots with her left hand. Skill does not relate to preference clarity. In the Theory page, there is a detailed explanation of preferences.
Back to top

15. Provide time and opportunity for questions following type reports to individuals.
Because the individual user files can exist for years, our program actively engages clients over a long period of time. During this time they learn more and more about themselves. No other program encourages such a long range approach to type knowledge.
Back to top

16. Be aware of own type biases and how they influence how you communicate type information.
The following is a quote from our facilitator's manual:
"As the main contributor to the design of the TypeFocusTM Careers Program, my own personality type, ENFP, has strongly influenced the way the program works. ENFPs are creative, flexible and finely tuned to the needs of others, so, it should come as no surprise that the program also tends to value these characteristics in a facilitator. I hope you will take the lesson plans as suggestions . . . approaches that you will modify to work within your own teaching preferences and classroom needs. In other words, I hope you are creative, flexible and finely tuned to the needs of yourself and your clients. What happens if you have different strengths? In that case, we would need to work in partnership - if you are practical, organized and businesslike, the possibilities for synergy between us are immense - but only if we communicate." David J. Wood
Back to top

    < back to main